Alterations in Glycopeptides Associated with Herceptin Treatment of Human Breast Carcinoma MCF-7 and T-Lymphoblastoid Cells

Download
  1. (PDF, 1 MB)
  2. Get@NRC: Alterations in Glycopeptides Associated with Herceptin Treatment of Human Breast Carcinoma MCF-7 and T-Lymphoblastoid Cells (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1074/mcp.M111.007765
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleMolecular
Volume10
Issue9
PagesM111.007765-1M111.007765-11
AbstractThe therapeutic humanized monoclonal antibody IgG1 known as Herceptin has shown remarkable antitumor effects. Although this type of therapy has increased the cancer-free survival of patients, not all tumors respond to this treatment and cancers often develop resistance to the antibody. Despite the fact that Herceptin function has been extensively studied, the precise mechanism underlying its antitumor activity still remains incompletely defined. We previously demonstrated on human breast MCF-7 carcinoma and T-lymphoblastoid CEM cells that monoclonal antibody in combination with Lipoplex consisting of Lipofectamine mixed with plasmid DNA showed a more profound effect on cancer cell viability than antibody alone. The analyses of N-glycans isolated from cancer cells showed dramatic differences in profiles when cells were exposed to Herceptin. Moreover, the investigation of glycosylated peptides from the same cancer cell models after treatment revealed further alterations in the post-translational modifications. Tandem mass spectra obtained from the samples treated confirmed the presence of a series of glycopeptides bearing characteristic oligosaccharides as described in IgG1. However some of them differed by mass differences that corresponded to peptide backbones not described previously and more of them were detected from Herceptin treated samples than from cells transfected with Heceptin/Lipoplex. The results indicate that the presence of Lipoplex prevents antibody transformation and elongates its proper function. The better understanding of the multipart changes described in the glycoconjugates could provide new insights into the mechanism by which antibody induces regression in cancers.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biodiagnostics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number19688671
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier7033fb21-5459-425b-b26c-45cdc7dd7a18
Record created2012-03-22
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)