Aerobic and anaerobic operation of an active membraneless direct methanol fuel cell

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.elecom.2011.12.020
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TypeArticle
Journal titleElectrochemistry Communications
Volume17
Pages2225; # of pages: 4
SubjectMembraneless; Direct methanol fuel cell; Direct methanol redox fuel cell; Aerobic; Anaerobic
AbstractIn this paper the operational and architectural flexibilities of a membraneless direct liquid fuel cell were demonstrated under aerobic and anaerobic configurations at 60 C and 1 atm. The aerobic membraneless direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) was fed an anolyte solution of 1 MCH3OH/0.5 MH2SO4 and an air oxidant. The anaerobic membraneless direct methanol redox fuel cell (DMRFC) was fed an anolyte solution of 1 M CH3OH/0.1 M HClO4 and a catholyte solution of 2 M Fe(ClO4)3 and 0.22 M Fe(ClO4)2 oxidant. For both cases the membraneless architecture performed significantly better than for the conventional PEM architecture with Nafion 117. The maximum power density for the membraneless and Nafion 117 based DMFC was 52 mW cm 2 and 41 mW cm 2 respectively. The maximum power density for the membraneless and Nafion 117 based DMRFC was 46mW cm 2 and 34mW cm 2 respectively. In addition, anaerobic operation using a Fe2 /Fe3 catholyte gave similar performance to that for air as an oxidant. Both membraneless and anaerobic operation can result in significant cost reduction with improved operational flexibility.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number19518266
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Record identifier71487c8d-895c-47f4-a626-213b2e9dbb1f
Record created2012-02-21
Record modified2016-05-09
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