Default mode network functional connectivity altered in failed back surgery syndrome

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2012.12.018
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Pain
ISSN1526-5900
Volume14
Issue5
Pages483491; # of pages: 9
Subjectadult; aged; article; clinical article; controlled study; default mode network; failed back surgery syndrome; female; functional magnetic resonance imaging; human; independent component analysis; insula; male; nerve cell network; postcentral gyrus; prefrontal cortex; primary motor cortex; sensorimotor integration
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to identify alterations in the default mode network of failed back surgery syndrome patients as compared to healthy subjects. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted at 3 Tesla and data were analyzed with an independent component analysis. Results indicate an overall reduced functional connectivity of the default mode network and recruitment of additional pain modulation brain regions, including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, insula, and additional sensory motor integration brain regions, including precentral and postcentral gyri, for failed back surgery syndrome patients. Perspective: This article presents alterations in the default mode network of chronic low back pain patients with failed back surgery syndrome as compared to healthy participants. © 2013 by the American Pain Society.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics (IBD-IBD)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269587
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Record identifier71e58c4f-7997-4f51-bd92-b7fd77ca1272
Record created2013-12-13
Record modified2016-05-09
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