The state of the art in modeling ship stability in waves

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TypeArticle
Conference25th American Towing Tank Conference, 24-25 September 1998, Iowa City, IA
AbstractIn 1996, the 22nd ITTC formed a Specialist Committee on Ship Stability. There were two main mandates given to this committee. The first was to examine the techniques for carrying out model experiments used to investigate the capsize of intact and damaged ships and provide guidelines for carrying out these experiments. The second was to assess the methods available for numerical simulations of the capsize of intact and damaged ships. This paper describes the findings of the committee so far, at the end of its second year of a three year term. The committee has prepared a summary of the state of the art in the areas of numerical and physical modeling of intact and damaged ships. It has also circulated a questionnaire concerning the type of numerical methods used by ITTC member organizations for predicting the capsize of intact and damaged ships. Another major objective of the committee is to 'benchmark' codes against a standard hull form, for which there are well documented experiments. The hull form chosen was a container ship tested at Osaka University. This paper provides a brief summary of the findings of the committee in each of the four subject areas and makes recommendations for standard model test methods for intact and damaged capsize predictions. It also discusses the preliminary findings from the questionnaire.
Publication date
Linkhttp://publications.iot.nrc.ca/documents/IR/IR-1998-20.pdf
AffiliationNRC Institute for Ocean Technology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
IdentifierIR-1998-20
NRC number6567
NPARC number8896055
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Record identifier723d7c44-5613-4109-a1a6-63f64d8d50d9
Record created2009-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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