Application of copper coatings onto used fuel canisters for the Canadian nuclear industry

Download
  1. (PDF, 2 MB)
  2. Get@NRC: Application of copper coatings onto used fuel canisters for the Canadian nuclear industry (Opens in a new window)
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleApplications of high pressure cold spray technology
Subjectnuclear fuel waste; reactor
AbstractThe Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) was established in 2002 under the Nuclear Fuel Waste Act (NFWA) to investigate approaches for managing Canada's used nuclear fuel. Currently, nuclear power plants are operating or undergoing decommissioning in Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick. Canada's CANDU reactors generate used fuel with small amounts of fissile nuclides compared to other types of nuclear reactors, owing to the use of unenriched uranium as a fuel source; used nuclear fuel is currently planned for disposal without reuse/reprocessing. The present approach, shown in Figure 1, envisions the conceptual long term storage of radioactive fuel bundles in specially designed canisters. The canisters would be emplaced in the rock of a suitable geological formation at a minimum of 500 m of depth, for an intended lifespan of more than 100,000 years (i.e., indefinite storage). The Canadian spent fuel canister consists of an inner container of steel strong enough to withstand geological pressures, including glaciations scenarios, and an outer shell of copper for corrosion resistance.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationAutomotive and Surface Transportation; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
IdentifierNRC-AST-BOU-0002
NPARC number21277258
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier726fe6ca-d299-4e4e-9429-83b6a26d6470
Record created2016-01-26
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)