Confirming white matter fMRI activation in the corpus callosum : Co-localization with DTI tractography

Download
  1. (PDF, 595 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Confirming white matter fMRI activation in the corpus callosum : Co-localization with DTI tractography (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.12.102
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleNeuroImage
Volume50
Issue2
Pages616621; # of pages: 6
AbstractRecently, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation has been detected in white matter, despite the widely-held belief that fMRI activation is restricted to gray matter. The objective of the current study was to determine whether the regions of white matter fMRI activation were structurally connected to the functional network in gray matter. To do this, we used fMRI-guided tractography to evaluate whether tracts connecting regions of gray matter fMRI activation were co-localized with white matter fMRI activation. An established interhemispheric transfer task was employed to elicit activation in the corpus callosum. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography was used to determine the existence of tracts that connected regions of gray matter fMRI activation to regions of activation in the corpus callosum. Corpus callosum activation was detected in the majority of participants. While there was individual variability in the location of corpus callosum activation, activation was commonly observed in the callosal mid-body, isthmus/splenium, or both. Despite the variability, gray matter fMRI-guided tractography identified tracts that were co-localized with corpus callosum fMRI activation in all instances. In addition, callosal activation had tracts to bilateral gray matter fMRI activation for 7/8 participants. The results confirmed that the activated regions of the corpus callosum were structurally connected to the functional network of gray matter regions involved in the task. These findings are an important step towards establishing the functional significance of white matter fMRI, and provide the foundation for future work combining white matter fMRI and DTI tractography to study brain connectivity.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biodiagnostics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number17653078
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier72f98f32-d06e-4b81-92e9-86f107cdf2e3
Record created2011-04-03
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)