MOS testbed for the characterization of targeted alpha therapy pharmaceuticals

Download
  1. Get@NRC: MOS testbed for the characterization of targeted alpha therapy pharmaceuticals (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1109/JSEN.2014.2365412
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleIEEE Sensors Journal
ISSN1530-437X
1558-1748
Volume15
Issue3
Pages16901696
Subjectpharmaceutical development; Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor; MOS; Radioimmunotherapy; RIT; Targeted Alpha Therapy; TAT; Targeted Radionuclide Therapy; TRT; aptamer; DNA; chelator characterization; DOTA
AbstractA metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) sensor has been designed, fabricated, and tested for use in the characterization of targeted alpha therapy pharmaceuticals. The sensor consists of a 16 × 16 array of 100-μm square alpha particle sensitive cells and has been fabricated in house using a simple MOS process. A subset of those cells is functionalized for the attachment of chelators under investigation for new pharmaceuticals. To demonstrate the utility of this sensor as a characterization platform, cells functionalized with 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-DNA conjugates were used to chelate americium-241 from solution, and the alpha particle emissions over the surface of the integrated circuit (IC) measured. The IC was able to quantitatively determine the amount of alpha emitter present over each cell, allowing the chelator and chelating chemistry to be assessed. Without any optimization of the chelation chemistry, a 21% increase of emissions was detected on cells functionalized with DOTA.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; Information and Communication Technologies
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001036
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier7445addb-c992-4ef5-9a3a-94762dbba3b9
Record created2016-12-02
Record modified2016-12-02
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)