Study of the mechanism for electrodeposition of dendrite-free zinc in an alkaline electrolyte modified with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpowsour.2014.10.140
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Power Sources
ISSN0378-7753
Volume274
Pages12491253
SubjectZn electrodeposition; alkaline; room temperature ionic liquids; batteries
AbstractElectrodeposition of Zn was conducted in a new electrolyte system composed of an alkaline solution (9 M KOH + 5 wt% ZnO) modified with a small amount (0.5 wt%) of room temperature ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (EMI-DCA). At a high deposition current density of 80 mA cm−2, a porous, dendrite-free Zn film characterized by clusters of small Zn particles was obtained. The mechanism for the modified Zn morphology in the EMI-DCA containing electrolyte was studied by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the addition of EMI-DCA changed the Zn nucleation process and reduced the potential variation during electrodeposition, which suppressed the uneven growth of Zn deposits and the formation of Zn dendrites. EIS results indicated that there was adsorption of EMI+ cations at the Zn film/electrolyte interface, which may have contributed to suppressed dendritic Zn growth.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationEnergy, Mining and Environment; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001631
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Record identifier75815c5d-ecda-4634-9313-6e68388467d5
Record created2017-03-13
Record modified2017-03-13
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