Pyrolysis of auto shredder residue : Experiments with a laboratory screw kiln reactor

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/S0165-2370(99)00016-9
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis
Volume51
Issue1-2
Pages181200; # of pages: 20
SubjectThermal decomposition; Thermal degradation; Pyrolysis; Screw kiln reactor; Tertiary recycling; Automobile shredder residue; Plastic waste
AbstractThe pyrolysis of automobile shredder residue (ASR) has been studied using a laboratory scale screw kiln reactor with a feed rate of about 100 g h⁻¹. Pyrolysis at temperatures between 500 and 750°C resulted in the production of gas, liquid and solid fractions with hydrocarbon yields of the organic fraction present in the feed increasing from 60–85% with increasing pyrolysis temperature. While the hydrocarbon pyrolysis product yield increased with pyrolysis temperature, the yield of the oil fraction was higher at the lower pyrolysis temperatures. The composition of the pyrolysis oil also changed with pyrolysis temperature, containing larger quantities of aliphatic compounds at the lower temperatures than at higher temperatures where aromatics were the major compounds. Many of the liquid pyrolysis products have been identified including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as organo nitrogen, sulphur and chlorine compounds. The data obtained have been compared with that obtained from a process using short pyrolysis residence times.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number41970
NPARC number14299095
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Record identifier77429177-a167-4444-a646-054f875623dc
Record created2010-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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