Design, kinematic modeling and performance testing of an electro-thermally driven microgripper for micromanipulation applications

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1088/0960-1317/16/8/014
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Micromechanics and Microengineering
ISSN1361-6439
Volume16
Pages15401549; # of pages: 10
Subjectelectronics and devices; instrumentation and measurement; nanoscale science and low-D systems
AbstractMicrogripping systems incorporate miniature end-effectors used to manipulate micro-sized objects such as tiny mechanical parts, electrical components, biological cells and bacteria. This paper presents a thorough study of the design, kinematics and static/dynamic performances, including electro-thermo performance characteristics, of the new microgripping system. The developed microgripper had a monolithic design which consisted of a combination of an in-plane electro-thermally driven microactuator and a compliant tweezing mechanism. The kinematics of the microgripper was studied as a transformation of input linear actuation motions into output tweezing displacements and compared with microgripper prototypes fabricated from 25 µm thick nickel foil by using laser micromachining technology. The static, dynamic and electro-thermal characteristics of the system performance were analyzed with respect to actual actuation motions, tweezing displacements, voltage, power, electric resistance and overall temperature under constant applied current within a range of {20, 40, ..., 160} mA. Maximum tweezing displacements of 47.5 µm (tweezing gap of 94.9 µm) were achieved under an applied current of 160 mA for a fabricated microgripper having a transform coefficient K = 1.731. The repeatability and reliability of the fabricated microgripper were also tested along with the capability to grip, hold and release a 110 µm diameter glass bead proving that this microgripper can be utilized as a grasping end-effector for micromanipulation, microrobotic and microassembly applications.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Industrial Materials Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21273504
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Record identifier786d6a07-9ea7-4a72-b905-37120e536ca3
Record created2015-01-13
Record modified2016-05-09
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