An experimental procedure to quantify air intrusion in commercial roofing systems

Download
  1. (PDF, 646 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: An experimental procedure to quantify air intrusion in commercial roofing systems (Opens in a new window)
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Building Enclosure Design
Pages1518; # of pages: 4
Subjectair intrusion, air leakage, roofing, wind, dynamic pressure, static pressure, mechanically attached roofing system
AbstractThe commercial buildings encompasses hospitals, schools, offices, lodging, and the retail sector with its big box stores, enclosed malls, strip malls, grocery stores and fast food restaurants Approximately one fourth of North American commercial buildings are roofed with Flexible Roof Systems (FRS) (NRCA 2004). In FRS, the waterproofing membrane is on the top exposed to the environmental forces with other roofing components such as insulation and cover board below it integrated to the structural substrate using mechanical fasteners. Field observations have identified that air intrusion in mechanically attached roof systems can affect roof system performance. However, the question of how much air movement occurs and which components provide the required resistance to air movement has never been addressed. To measure air intrusion in mechanically attached roof systems, an experimental study is recently completed at the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada as part of its Special Interest Group for Dynamic Evaluation of Roofing Systems (SIGDERS) research.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number54460
21716
NPARC number20374549
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier7b7c5ae3-6165-4ff9-bb19-f2dede3f5beb
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)