Experimental study of the effect of tool orientation on surface quality in five-axis micro-milling of brass using ball-end mills

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TypeArticle
Proceedings titleTransactions of the North American Manufacturing Research Institution of SME
Conference39th Annual North American Manufacturing Research Conference, NAMRC39, 13 June 2011 through 17 June 2011, Corvallis, OR
ISSN1047-3025
ISBN9781618390578
Volume39
Pages320325; # of pages: 6
SubjectFive-axis; Micro milling; Surface qualities; Tool orientation; Cutting forces
AbstractThe effect of tool orientation on the final surface geometry and quality in five-axis micro-milling of brass using ball-end mills is investigated. Straight grooves are cut with different tool inclination and tilt angles, and the resulting surfaces are characterized using an optical profilometer and microscope. Results of various cutting experiments and analysis of the final surface geometry show that varying the tool orientation reduces rubbing of the material at the bottom of the grooves, which often occurs in ball-end milling of brass. Results also indicate that a non-zero tool inclination angle can result in more accurate geometry profiles compared to the case where the tool axis is normal to the surface. The experimental analysis for surface roughness profiles also shows that applying a tool inclination angle of 15° can considerably improve the surface roughness at the bottom of the grooves.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Automotive (AUTO-AUTO)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271171
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Record identifier7bf9e799-6e1a-4037-8ea1-21043f829cc2
Record created2014-03-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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