Correlation between Young’s Modulus and Impregnation Quality of Epoxy-Impregnated SWCNT Buckypaper

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.compositesa.2010.04.018
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TypeArticle
Journal titleComposites Part A : Applied Science and Manufacturing
Volume41
Issue9
Pages11841191; # of pages: 8
SubjectA. Nano-structures; B. Elasticity; B. Porosity; B. Porosity; C. Micro-mechanics
AbstractCarbon nanotube (CNT) sheets, also known as buckypaper, have high potential for structural applications due to their high volume fraction of CNT, the strongest and stiffest materials known. In this work, two different techniques, one based on positive pressure and another based on vacuum infiltration, are utilized to impregnate single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) buckypaper sheets of 50–70 μm in thickness, resulting in a Young’s modulus of up to 15.4 GPa. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrates that the vacuum-based technique results in more effective impregnation of the buckypaper than the positive pressure technique. Thermogravimetry analysis of vacuum-impregnated specimens indicated a void content ranging from 5% to 32%. An advanced Mori–Tanaka-based micromechanics technique is also utilized to predict the effect of SWCNT volume fraction and void content on Young’s modulus of nanocomposites. These calculations suggest a higher void content of around 40% for the vacuum-impregnated composites.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Aerospace Research; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number17653087
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Record identifier7c91208f-2de7-4abb-9314-1e58bf4a305a
Record created2011-04-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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