Strain energy : a performance attribute of modified bituminous roofing membranes

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Conference3rd Int. Symposium on Roofs and Roofing: 25 April 1988, Bournemouth, U.K.
Pages8192; # of pages: 12
SubjectRoofing; bituminous roofings; strain; strength of materials; atactic polypropylene; styrene butadiene styrene; Roofs; Roofs
AbstractThe concept of strain energy of rupture due to tensile load was studied for application as a performance attribute of modified bituminous roofing membranes using various samples. These included eight APP (Atactic Polypropylene) and four SBS (Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene copolymer) modified and reinforced samples, and one SBS modified and non- reinforced. They were tensile tested to rupture. The test values of load, elongation, and area under the load- elongation curve were used to compute strength (T), strain ( S), strength-strain product (Q), and strain energy (U). A relationship between strain energy and strength-strain product was established in terms of their ratio (R). The limits of the range of R values were used to develop a graphical method that simplified the application of strain energy criterion for evaluating membranes without measuring energy. In this method, each point plotted on the strength- strain graph represents three dimensions - T, S and Q - where the product Q is a measure of energy. It is shown that a single requirement of strain energy can replace individual requirements of load and elongation, and that it accommodates very low to very high modulus materials which include APP or SBS modified and reinforced or non-reinforced membranes.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number31063
NPARC number20386353
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Record identifier7c937b11-db8f-4400-835f-4a4db4c5fd68
Record created2012-07-25
Record modified2016-05-09
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