Coincidence and covariance data acquisition in photoelectron and -ion spectroscopy. II. Analysis and applications

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/09500340.2013.839840
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Modern Optics
ISSN0950-0340
Volume60
Issue17
Pages14391451; # of pages: 13
AbstractWe use an analytical theory of noisy Poisson processes, developed in the preceding companion publication, to compare coincidence and covariance measurement approaches in photoelectron and -ion spectroscopy. For non-unit detection efficiencies, coincidence data acquisition (DAQ) suffers from false coincidences. The rate of false coincidences grows quadratically with the rate of elementary ionization events. To minimize false coincidences for rare event outcomes, very low event rates may hence be required. Coincidence measurements exhibit high tolerance to noise introduced by unstable experimental conditions. Covariance DAQ on the other hand is free of systematic errors as long as stable experimental conditions are maintained. In the presence of noise, all channels in a covariance measurement become correlated. Under favourable conditions, covariance DAQ may allow orders of magnitude reduction in measurement times. Finally, we use experimental data for strong-field ionization of 1,3-butadiene to illustrate how fluctuations in experimental conditions can contaminate a covariance measurement, and how such contamination can be detected.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationSecurity and Disruptive Technologies; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21270485
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Record identifier7f8ab715-623e-4348-80e7-6186cad49d31
Record created2014-02-13
Record modified2016-05-09
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