Self-controlled formation of microlenses by optical breakdown inside wide-band-gap materials

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1063/1.3049133
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TypeArticle
Journal titleApplied Physics Letters
ISSN0003-6951
Volume93
Issue24
Article number243118
SubjectCorundum; Electromagnetic pulse; Gallium alloys; Lenses; Mica; Microlenses; Optical instruments; Optical properties; Refractive index; Semiconductor materials; Silica; Silicate minerals; Silicon compounds; Ultrashort pulses; Common features; Defocusing; Focused femtosecond pulses; Lens formations; Linear absorptions; Linearly polarized lights; Material modifications; Nano cracks; Optical breakdowns; Subwavelength periodic structures; Transparent materials; Fused silica
AbstractBy repeatedly illuminating fused silica slabs with focused femtosecond pulses, we permanently decrease the local refractive index without increasing the linear absorption or scattering. This progressively forms a biconvex lens in the prefocal region. With linearly polarized light, the index change reaches several percent and is associated with the formation of an array of planar nanocracks. We analyze the polarization-dependent focusing power of the subwavelength periodic structure. While the detailed material modification changes, spontaneous defocusing lens formation is a common feature of every wide-band-gap transparent materials that we have studied (SiO2, BK7, LiF, sapphire, and mica). © 2008 American Institute of Physics.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21276247
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Record identifier81e92357-3d2c-43ca-8b7f-44a2813e80ac
Record created2015-09-28
Record modified2016-05-09
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