The Significance of Ferroelectric Phase Transitions for the Earth and Planetary Interiors

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/0031-9201(77)90146-7
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titlePhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors
Volume14
Issue2
Pages612; # of pages: 7
AbstractWith the compelling evidence for orthorhombic perovskite ABO3 structures in a major part of the earth's mantle, the question of whether any of these are ferroelectric (FE) or antiferroelectric should be of supreme importance. To answer this question the authors have conducted dielectric property studies at pressures up to 5.5 GPa on single crystals and polycrystalline aggregates of BaTiO3 as well as other FE materials representing FE polarization mechanisms. The results indicate that: (1) h.p.-induced FE phases are indeed likely to play an important part in the earth's mantle; and (2) existing FE state, occuring as elastic and dielectric inhomogeneities, can persist to much higher pressures than expected on the basis of the pressure dependence of isolated and unclamped FE crystals. It is suggested that the presence of FE states in the earth's mantle may be responsible for some of its anomalous elastic and dielectric features, especially its attenuating properties. It is conjectured that effects of FE states on properties of the Jovian planets might even be more prominant, especially those involving dielectric constant and polarization.
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LanguageEnglish
Peer reviewedNo
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NPARC number12338277
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Record identifier822f72d3-ab23-4366-b728-8458a2b74026
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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