Measuring morale, cohesion and confidence in leadership: what are the implications for leaders?

Download
  1. (PDF, 1 MB)
  2. Get@NRC: Measuring morale, cohesion and confidence in leadership: what are the implications for leaders? (Opens in a new window)
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleCanadian Journal of Police & Security Services
Volume1
IssueWinter 4
Pages353364; # of pages: 12
Subjectmorale, working conditions, stress, coping
AbstractAlthough high morale, unit cohesion, and confidence in leadership are considered by military leaders to be essential elements for victory on the battlefield, research indicates that officer assessments of these variables are generally inaccurate. To assist commanding officers in these assessments, the Unit Climate Profile was developed for use with Canadian soldiers in deployed operations. Using data collected from soldiers in Bosnia over a three-year period, the present study was designed to test a model of the relations between morale, cohesion, confidence in leadership, coping strategies, stress, and strain. It was hypothesized that as morale, cohesion, and confidence in leadership are conceptually similar to social support, they would moderate the relation between stress and strain. Structural equation modeling and hierarchical regression were used to test the proposed model and several moderating effects. Results indicate that positive coping, task cohesion, and social cohesion moderate the relation between stress and strain such that those individuals who reported using or seeking higher levels of these resources experienced lower strain.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number47051
16319
NPARC number20377388
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier82e8f946-e861-4672-9da6-94244cf90da9
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)