Isolation and characterization of two antimicrobial peptides from haemocytes of the American lobster Homarus americanus

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.fsi.2008.04.005
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TypeArticle
Journal titleFish & Shellfish Immunology
Volume25
Pages181184; # of pages: 4
AbstractTwo antimicrobial peptides from haemocytes of the American lobster, Homarus americanus H. Milne Edwards 1837, were isolated and partially characterised – the first such description for this species. CAP-2, an approximately 12 kDa peptide, contained amino acid sequences corresponding to the predicted sequence for Hoa-crustin. Crustins are whey acidic protein (WAP) domain - containing peptides isolated from crustacean haemocytes. CAP-2 did not have any activity towards the Gram positive coccus Aerococcus viridans unlike carcinin, a crustin from Carcinus maenas haemocytes, which may partially explain the lobster's susceptibility to this bacterium. A second peptide, CAP-1, was a multimer composed of 4–6 kDa subunits with similarities to amphibian temporins. CAP-1 may represent a novel group of antimicrobial peptides for marine invertebrates and has been tentatively named ‘homarin’. Homarin had bacteriostatic activity against some Gram negative bacteria and both protozoastatic and protozoacidal activity against two cultured scuticociliate parasites Mesanophrys chesapeakensis and Anophryoides haemophila, the latter a significant pathogen of H. americanus.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Marine Biosciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number42785
1749
NPARC number3538522
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Record identifier853f6b0b-e808-499d-be8e-ca4c2b1c0a8e
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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