Experimental fire tower studies of elevator pressurization systems for smoke control

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TypeArticle
Journal titleASHRAE Transactions
ISSN0001-2505
Volume93
Issue2
Pages22352256; # of pages: 22
Subjectsmoke controls; elevator shafts; dampers; air vents; smoke movement; mechanical pressurization; handicapped evacuation; firefighting; pressure control systems; Open-plan offices [cubicles]; Smoke management
AbstractTests were conducted in the experimental fire tower at the National Research Council of Canada to study smoke movement through elevator shafts caused by a large fire and to determine the effectiveness of mechanical pressurization in keeping the elevator shaft and lobbies tenable for evacuation of the handicapped and for use by firefighters. The tests indicated that pressure control is required to cope with loss of pressurization due to open doors. Equations were developed to assist in designing pressure control systems involving either a variable supply air rate with feedback control or relief dampers in the walls of the elevator shaft or lobbies. Tests conducted in the tower indicated that for both methods of pressure control, comparison of measured and calculated values of supply air rates and pressure differences are in good agreement.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
NotePresented at the 1987 ASHRAE Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN, USA, June 29-July 1, 1987
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIRC-P-1548
NRC number29121
3973
NPARC number20375441
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Record identifier8684ef05-0cdc-46ef-be95-02e614ca1f3f
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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