Thiocyanate levels in human saliva : quantitation by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1006/abio.1996.0323
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TypeArticle
Journal titleAnalytical Biochemistry
ISSN0003-2697
Volume240
Issue1
Pages712; # of pages: 6
AbstractA new quantitative method, based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, was developed to evaluate the thiocyanate concentration in human saliva. Saliva samples were collected following a typical protocol and infrared spectra obtained from very small volumes (5 μl) deposited on a barium fluoride substrate. Exogenous potassium thiocyanate was used for calibration of the endogenous thiocyanate. This methodology does not require separation or extraction procedures. Human saliva spectra contain a characteristic marker band, due to thiocyanate, at 2058 cm−1. The integrated area of this band can be used for linear regression analysis and provides a good correlation between band area and thiocyanate concentration. Recovery of thiocyanate added to saliva was 100%. Centrifugation and dialysis experiments demonstrated that thiocyanate in saliva exists as a free or loosely bound ion. Saliva collected in the afternoon from 25 different subjects had a thiocyanate concentration of 0.83 ± 0.42 (mean ± SD) mmol/liter. In 4 subjects whose circardian pattern was investigated there was evidence of a higher thiocyanate concentration in saliva samples collected in the morning hours.
Publication date
PublisherAcademic Press, Inc.
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biodiagnostics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number413
NPARC number9147674
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Record identifier880f03b9-66a1-4235-b0db-950750960d6e
Record created2009-06-25
Record modified2016-11-07
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