Analytical modeling of oxide thickness variation of metals under high temperature solid-particle erosion

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1142/S1793962314500020
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TypeArticle
Journal titleInternational Journal of Modeling, Simulation, and Scientific Computing
ISSN1793-9623
Issue2
Pages116; # of pages: 16
AbstractThe paper presents a study of model development for predicting the oxide thickness on metals under high temperature solid-particle erosion. The model is created based on the theory of solid-particle erosion that characterizes the erosion damage as deformation wear and cutting wear, incorporating the effect of the oxide scale on the eroded surface under high temperature erosion. Then the instantaneous oxide thickness is the result of the synergetic effect of erosion and oxidation. The developed model is applied on a Ni-based Al-containing (Ni-Al) alloy to investigate the oxide thickness variation with erosion duration of the alloy at high temperatures. The results show that the thickness of the oxide scale on the alloy surface increases with the exposure time and temperature when the surface is not attacked by particles. However, when particles impact on the alloy surface, the oxide thickness is reduced, although oxidation is continuing. This indicates that oxidation does not benefit the erosion resistance of this alloy at high temperatures due to the low growth rate of the oxide. © 2014 World Scientific Publishing Company.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Aerospace (AERO-AERO)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21270896
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Record identifier88b1e98f-1555-4a16-acaf-f1e78b7cc387
Record created2014-02-18
Record modified2016-05-09
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