The fire resistance test and its relation to real-world fires

Download
  1. (PDF, 1 MB)
  2. Get@NRC: The fire resistance test and its relation to real-world fires (Opens in a new window)
AuthorSearch for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleFire and Materials
ISSN0308-0501
Volume5
Issue3
Pages112122; # of pages: 11
Subjectfire resistance tests; furnaces; efficiency; normalized heat load; fire resistance test furnaces characteristics, efficiency; furnace size effects; furnace gas effects; theorem of uniformity of normalized heat load; Performance of:; essai de resistance au feu; chaudiere; efficacite; charge calorifique normalisee
AbstractThe characteristics of fire resistance test furnaces are examined. It is shown that the efficiency of a furnace, as measured in terms of the heat load it imposes on a test specimen, depends markedly on the size of the furnace and the nature of the furnace gas. Only with large furnaces heated by gases of high radiation potential (near-black gases) can the test results be regarded as meaningful and reproducible. Relining a defective furnace with a material of very low thermal inertia, though helpful, is unlikely to bring its performance up to the required level. Methods of determining the efficiency of test furnaces are outlined. The theorem of uniformity of normalized heat load is of satisfactory validity when applied to real-world compartment fires. The normalized heat load is recognized as a succinct descriptor of fires with respect to their destructive potential. As such, it forms the basis for correlating real- world fires with standard test fires.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierDBR-P-1022
NRC number20009
1518
NPARC number20378654
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier897f00d5-331f-446f-8199-6ca24a868bc7
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)
Date modified: