Integration of toxicological and chemical tools to assess the bioavailability of metals and energetic compounds in contaminated soils

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2008.07.056
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TypeArticle
Journal titleChemosphere
Volume74
Issue1
Pages166177; # of pages: 12
SubjectAnimals; Biological Availability; Bismuth/metabolism/pharmacokinetics/toxicity; Cadmium/metabolism/pharmacokinetics/toxicity; Lead/metabolism/pharmacokinetics/toxicity; Metals/metabolism/pharmacokinetics/ toxicity; Oligochaeta/rug effects/growth &development/metabolism; Soil Pollutants/metabolism/pharmacokinetics/toxicity; Zinc/metabolism/pharmacokinetics/toxicity; Assessment; Bioavailability; Bioaccessibility; Explosives; Metals; Soils
AbstractBioavailability is critical for understanding effects that might result from exposure of biota to contaminated soils. Soils from military range and training areas (RTAs) are contaminated principally by energetic materials (EM) and metals. Their chemical characteristics are relatively well known and toxicity assessment of soils from RTAs are in some cases available. However, bioavailability on these sites needs to be comprehensively characterized. A holistic approach to bioavailability, incorporating both chemical and earthworm toxicological indicators, was applied to soils from an anti-tank firing range at a Canadian Forces Base. Results showed that HMX and the metals Zn, Pb, Bi and Cd, though not consistently the prevailing toxicants, were the most accessible to earthworms. Some metals (notably Cu, Zn, Cr and Bi) were also accumulated in earthworm tissue but those were not necessarily expected given their bioaccessibility (i.e., the chemical availability of contaminants in the environment for the organisms) at the beginning of the exposure. The tested soils impaired earthworm reproduction and reduced adult growth. Measurement of selected sublethal parameters indicated that lysosomal integrity (determined as the neutral red retention time--NRRT) was decreased, while elevated superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity suggested that earthworms experienced oxidative stress. The correspondence between the NRRT and metal contamination pattern suggested that metals may be the main cause of lysosomal disruption in EM-contaminated soils. The approach to bioavailability appraisal adopted in this case appears to be a promising practice for site-specific assessment of contaminated land.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Biotechnology Research Institute
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number49933
NPARC number3538710
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Record identifier89a93cf8-56d2-4fcd-a0b1-80f56837681a
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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