Effects of growth temperature on the SiO[sub 2]/Si(100) interface structure

DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1116/1.587868
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TypeArticle
Proceedings titlePapers from the 22nd Annual Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Semiconductor Interfaces
Series titleJournal of vacuum science & technology. B, Microelectronics and nanometer structures processing, measurement and phenomena 2nd ser.; Volume 13
Conference22nd Annual Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Semiconductor Interfaces, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA, January 8-12, 1995
Pages16261629; # of pages: 4
SubjectCHARGE STATES; ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE; INTERFACE STATES; OXIDATION; PHOTOEMISSION; SILICON; SILICON OXIDES; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TEMPERATURE RANGE 1000 - 4000 K; TEMPERATURE RANGE 400 - 1000 K
AbstractSynchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (PES) has been used to study thermal SiO2/Si(100) interfaces. Oxides were grown at 700, 800, 900, and 1000 °C and etched back to a thickness ~ 0.5舑1.5 nm for PES measurements. Comparison of Si 2p core levels with in situ ultrahigh vacuum-grown SiO2 on Si(100) indicated that various Si oxidation states, Six + , are present at the interface. The results show that the amount of both Si2 + and Si3 + increases with increasing oxidation temperature while the amount of Si1 + remains constant. For these furnace grown oxides, structural relaxation to relieve strains rather than kinetic growth considerations governs the structure and suboxide distribution at the SiO2/Si(100) interface.
Publication date
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12338639
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Record identifier8a3f89c2-f1fa-431b-a03c-8196002c89ed
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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