Suppression of incommensurate spin-density waves in thin epitaxial Cr(110) layers of a V/Cr multilayer

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2003-00332-y
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TypeArticle
Journal titleThe European Physical Journal B : Condensed Matter and Complex Systems
Volume36
Issue2
Pages175181; # of pages: 7
AbstractWe observed a complete suppression of the incommensurate spin-density wave in thin Cr layers of a V/Cr multilayer in a temperature range from 550 K down to 2 K. The (110)-oriented V/Cr multilayer consisting of 30 nm thick Cr layers and 5 nm thick V layers was investigated by neutron and X-ray diffraction (XRD). From the XRD experiments we were able to determine that the epitaxial strain of the Cr layers in the V/Cr multilayer is about 90% larger than in earlier studied Fe/Cr(110) multilayers. That leads to a completely different magnetic phase diagram as revealed by neutron diffraction experiments. The existence of the commensurate antiferromagnetic structure in the Cr layers can be observed in the whole temperature range without a phase transition to an incommensurate spin-density wave at lower temperatures. In order to elucidate the proximity effects further we also performed experiments in an external magnetic field. Up to a field of 4 T we found no change in the magnetic structure of the Cr films whereas in earlier experiments on Fe/Cr(110) multilayers we could observe a strong perpendicular pinning of the Cr polarization to the Fe magnetization.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Canadian Neutron Beam Centre
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12339108
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Record identifier8ad2f24e-0d56-4748-af49-9c28cd172536
Record created2009-09-11
Record modified2016-05-09
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