Electricity generation from carbon monoxide and syngas in a microbial fuel cell

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s00253-011-3188-4
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TypeArticle
Journal titleApplied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Volume90
Issue3
Pages827836; # of pages: 10
SubjectMicrobial fuel cell; Syngas; Carbon monoxide
AbstractElectricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been a subject of significant research efforts. MFCs employ the ability of electricigenic bacteria to oxidize organic substrates using an electrode as an electron acceptor. While MFC application for electricity production from a variety of organic sources has been demonstrated, very little research on electricity production from carbon monoxide and synthesis gas (syngas) in an MFC has been reported. Although most of the syngas today is produced from non-renewable sources, syngas production from renewable biomass or poorly degradable organic matter makes energy generation from syngas a sustainable process, which combines energy production with the reprocessing of solid wastes. An MFC-based process of syngas conversion to electricity might offer a number of advantages such as high Coulombic efficiency and biocatalytic activity in the presence of carbon monoxide and sulfur components. This paper presents a discussion on microorganisms and reactor designs that can be used for operating an MFC on syngas.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Biotechnology Research Institute
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number53353
NPARC number17906263
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Record identifier8dff91d3-80f1-4a1b-95d5-8200adb25fb3
Record created2011-07-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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