The effect of turbulent intermittency on scattering into an acoustic shadow zone

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1121/1.414984
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJ. Acoust. Soc. Am.
The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume99
Issue6
Pages33933400; # of pages: 8
SubjectACOUSTICS; DENSITY FUNCTIONAL METHOD; DISSIPATION FACTOR; SCATTERING THEORY; SOUND WAVES; TURBULENCE; WAVE PROPAGATION
AbstractClassical scattering theory predicts that the intensity of a saturated, scattered signal will have an exponential probability density function (pdf). However, the classical theory does not account for intermittency of the turbulence, which causes quantities such as the scattering cross section to vary in space and time. The classical theory can be modified to include intermittency by making the strength of the turbulence (i.e., the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy) a local property of the scattering volume. The dissipation rate averaged over the scattering volume has a log-normal pdf. The intermittent theory is compared to measured pdf's obtained for scattering into an outdoor, ground-based, acoustic shadow zone. Deviations from the exponential pdf are observed readily in the data, and are predicted well by the intermittent theory. Intermittency is shown to dramatically increase the probability of measuring large values of the scattered intensity.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12328487
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Record identifier8fbd5b92-b02a-4465-bb2a-0dd806ef71b8
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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