Demonstration of the CPMA-electrometer system for calibrating black carbon particulate mass instruments

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/02786826.2015.1010033
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TypeArticle
Journal titleAerosol Science and Technology
ISSN0278-6826
1521-7388
Volume49
Issue3
Pages152158
AbstractIn an effort to improve regulations for particulate emissions from aircraft engines, the Aircraft Exhaust Emissions Measurement Committee, SAE E-31, is investigating instruments to measure black carbon mass concentration in real time. The current candidates are a laser-induced incandescence instrument (LII 300) and a photo-acoustic Micro-Soot Sensor (MSS). However, both of these instruments use indirect techniques, measuring parameters other than the actual mass of particulate in the exhaust, and therefore require calibration. Previously, it has been shown that a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) can be used in conjunction with an aerosol electrometer to traceably generate an aerosol with known mass concentration. This system can be used to rapidly calibrate particle mass instruments (on the order of minutes), without the time-consuming process of filter sampling, which is often used for calibration and prone to sampling artifacts. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of the CPMA-electrometer system for calibrating two LII 300 instruments and two MSS instruments, which were calibrated to the NIOSH 5040 standard. The correlations between the CPMA-electrometer system and the challenge instrument were highly linear for both the LII and the MSS, and agreed well with the previous calibration. All four instruments were found to correlate with the CPMA-electrometer system with R2 values of 0.993 to 0.999. The standard uncertainty in the CPMA-electrometer system averaged 4.3% and was as low as 2.6% for some measurements. With a simple improvement to the aerosol electrometer, we estimate this average uncertainty would be less than 3%. This lower uncertainty and much higher speed of measurement support the use of the CPMA-electrometer system as a mass measurement calibration method for black carbon instruments.
Publication date
PublisherTaylor & Francis Group
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationMeasurement Science and Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23000016
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Record identifier9009b8e4-c464-4c50-bc17-282f128368eb
Record created2016-05-19
Record modified2016-05-24
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