The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the LPS from Myxococcus xanthus strain DK1622: Carbohydr.Res.

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TypeArticle
Journal titleCarbohydr.Res.
Volume342
Issue16
Pages24742480; # of pages: 7
SubjectACID; Acids; backbone; Bacteria; Canada; carbohydrate; Carbohydrate Sequence; chemical; chemistry; classification; COMPONENT; CORE REGION; DISACCHARIDE; KDO; lipid; Lipid A; LIPID-A; Lipopolysaccharides; LPS; Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; method; Methods; Myxococcus xanthus; O-chain; POLYSACCHARIDE; REGION; REPEATING UNIT; RESIDUES; Spectrometry,Mass,Electrospray Ionization; SPECTROSCOPIC; STRAIN; structure; UNIT
AbstractGram-negative rod shaped bacterium Myxococcus xanthus DK1622 produces a smooth-type LPS. The structure of the polysaccharide O-chain and the core-lipid A region of the LPS has been determined by chemical and spectroscopic methods. The O-chain was built up of disaccharide repeating units having the following structure: -->6)-alpha-D-Glcp-(1-->4)-alpha-D-GalpNAc6oMe*-(1--> with partially methylated GalNAc residue. The core region consisted of a phosphorylated hexasaccharide, containing one Kdo residue, unsubstituted at O-4, and no heptose residues. The lipid A component consisted of beta-GlcN-(1-->6)-alpha-GlcN1P disaccharide, N-acylated with 13-methyl-C14-3OH (iso-C15-3OH), C16-3OH, and 15-methyl-C16-3OH (iso-C17-3OH) acids. The lipid portion contained O-linked iso-C16 acid
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biological Sciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC numberMACLEAN2007
NPARC number9369139
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Record identifier912c7f59-3268-477f-9ef6-3b6ba9269d9d
Record created2009-07-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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