The effect of nitrobenzoic and aminobenzoic acids on the hydration of tricalcium silicate: a conduction calorimetric study

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TypeArticle
Journal titleThermochimica acta
ISSN0040-6031
Volume190
Pages325333; # of pages: 9
SubjectConcrete
AbstractThe hydration of tricalcium silicate (C3S) in the presence of 0.004, 0.008 and 0.016 mol.% (with respect to 100 g of the silicate) of benzoic acid, o-, m- and p-nitrobenzoic and aminobenzoic acids, was followed by conduction calorimetry. Benzoic acid at 0.004 and 0.008 moles behaved as a delayed accelerator of hydration, whereas at a dosage of 0.016 moles it performed as an accelerator by decreasing the onset of the induction period and promoting the earlier appearance of the main exothermic peak. The m- and p-nitrobenzoic acids accelerated the hydration of C3S, whereas o-nitrobenzoic acid acted as a retarder. Both m- and p-aminobenzoic acids retarded the hydration by delaying the appearance of the main exothermal peak. o-Aminobenzoic acid showed a similar effect to that of the reference at early times by not affecting the induction period and the maximum rate-of-heat peak. However, it increased slightly the amplitude of the main exothermic peak. The compounds that promoted the appearance of a heat peak at periods of 1 h or earlier exhibited an acceleration effect. In the presence of retarders this peak did not appear.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIRC-P-1708
NRC number33094
3145
NPARC number20330391
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Record identifier923c9848-d1e3-49ac-aa5d-ac4d50265fe2
Record created2012-07-18
Record modified2016-05-09
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