Photographing impact of molten molybdenum particles in a plasma spray

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1361/105996305X59422
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Thermal Spray Technology
Volume14
Issue3
Pages354361; # of pages: 7
Subjectdroplet; particle impact; plasma spray; splashing; splat
AbstractPlasma-sprayed molten molybdenum particles (40 μm in diameter) were photographed impinging at high velocity (140 m/s) on a glass substrate at room temperature. An optical sensor detected thermal radiation emitted by a droplet as it approached the substrate and activated a time delay unit. After a selected time interval, an Nd:YAG laser was triggered, emitting a 5 ns pulse that provided illumination for a chargecoupled device (CCD) camera to photograph the impacting droplet through a long-range microscope. By varying the delay before pulsing the laser, different stages of droplet deformation were recorded. Impacting droplets spread into a thin circular film that ruptured and broke into small fragments. An optical detector recording thermal radiation from the impacting droplet gave a signal that increased as the droplet spread out, reached a maximum when the liquid film began to rupture, and decreased as portions of the droplet recoiled because of surface tension and then flew out of view of the photodetector.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Industrial Materials Institute
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number47939
NPARC number15955051
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Record identifier92b075be-0e2c-4a6c-bfce-8f3353a4ac48
Record created2010-08-17
Record modified2016-05-09
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