Carbonized chicken eggshell membranes with 3D architectures as high-performance electrode materials for supercapacitors

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/aenm.201100548
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TypeArticle
Journal titleAdvanced Energy Materials
ISSN1614-6832
Volume2
Issue4
Pages431437; # of pages: 7
Subjectnitrogen-rich carbon; supercapacitors; eggshells; biomass waste; energy storage
AbstractSupercapacitor electrode materials are synthesized by carbonizing a common livestock biowaste in the form of chicken eggshell membranes. The carbonized eggshell membrane (CESM) is a three-dimensional macroporous carbon film composed of interwoven connected carbon fibers containing around 10 wt% oxygen and 8 wt% nitrogen. Despite a relatively low surface area of 221 m2 g−1, exceptional specific capacitances of 297 F g−1 and 284 F g−1 are achieved in basic and acidic electrolytes, respectively, in a 3-electrode system. Furthermore, the electrodes demonstrate excellent cycling stability: only 3% capacitance fading is observed after 10 000 cycles at a current density of 4 A g−1. These very attractive electrochemical properties are discussed in the context of the unique structure and chemistry of the material.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Institute for Nanotechnology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21268195
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Record identifier931f3382-2c2d-4afd-a32b-8d3ba975f070
Record created2013-05-30
Record modified2016-05-09
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