Superconductivity in lithium under high pressure investigated with density functional and Eliashberg theory

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.79.054524
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePhysical review. B, Condensed matter and materials physics
Volume79
Issue5
Pages054524-1054524-11; # of pages: 11
Subjectsuperconducting; pseudopotential plane-wave; perturbation theory; electron-phonon coupling
AbstractStructural phase transitions and superconducting properties in three phases (9R, fcc, and cI16) of solid Li are investigated using a pseudopotential plane-wave method based on density functional perturbation theory. In particular, it is shown that phonon softening is responsible for a pressure-induced fcc→cI16 transition as well as for a significant enhancement of electron-phonon coupling and superconducting transition temperature Tc preceding this structural transformation. The nature of superconductivity in the fcc and cI16 phases is examined by solving the Eliashberg equations with the spectral function α2F(ω) obtained from first-principles calculations and by evaluating the functional derivative δTc/δα2F(ω). The calculated Tc reaches a maximum at pressure close to the fcc→cI16 transition and is significantly reduced in the cI16 phase, in agreement with the trend observed experimentally. The variation in Tc as a function of pressure is explained in terms of the functional derivative and shifts of the spectral weight.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number16690779
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Record identifier9340732d-c14f-4f2f-97b2-e830663cb591
Record created2011-02-15
Record modified2016-05-09
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