Theoretical and experimental study of microcell and macrocell corrosion in patch repair

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.cemconcomp.2006.05.010
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TypeArticle
Journal titleCement & Concrete Composites
Volume28
IssueSeptember
Pages685695; # of pages: 11
Subjectpatch repair, corrosion, macrocell, microcell, corrosion kinetics; Concrete
AbstractPatch repair is commonly used to rectify localized corrosion induced damage in concrete structures. However, inadequate durability in patch repair systems caused by new corrosion attack is prevalent. From the prevailing understanding, the mechanism is attributed to macrocell corrosion formed between repaired area (called patch) and its adjacent unrepaired area (called substrate), and thereby ensuring electrochemical compatibility between the two areas is deemed to be the key element to reduce the corrosion risk and thus to achieve a successful repair. This paper examined the corrosion mechanism and the concept of compatibility in patch repair systems from fundamental electrochemical principles and experimental verification. It was illustrated that both macrocell and microcell corrosion mechanisms could play significant roles, and the total corrosion could be underestimated if the latter is overlooked. Although theincompatibility serves as the driving force for the macrocell corrosion, in light of corrosion kinetics, it was shown that the corrosion magnitude depends more on the individual corrosion kinetics of the anode or cathode.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number48659
17959
NPARC number20377019
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Record identifier93895508-c15d-4c8d-832b-01c8719d4ea4
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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