Settlement studies on the Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto

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Journal titleEngineering Journal
Pages3137; # of pages: 7
Subjectsettlement; strengthening; foundations; elastic modulus
AbstractConstruction of large structures on soil without the benefit of piles or caissons to transfer the building loads down to bedrock or other solid strata is sometimes done with much apprehension. There are savings to be gained so settlement studies were carried out on the Mt. Sinai Hospital in Toronto which is resting on a steel-reinforced concrete mat foundation. Total settlement under the center of the main wing of the building is about 0.6 inches, much less than the predicted 5 inches from laboratory consolidation tests. The best laboratory value for modulus of elasticity in the stress range applied by the building loads is about 600 TSF. Laboratory and field values of modulus agree reasonably well if Poisson's ratio is between 0.3 and 0.4 but is poor if a modulus of 0.5 is assumed. It is concluded that a mat foundation on a subsoil typical of the downtown Toronto area is completely satisfactory; the laboratory consolidation test overestimates the settlement of the structure on glacial till; compression of the soil under these loading conditions is mainly elastic; triaxial shear tests with cycled axial stress is a more accurate method of determining modulus of elasticity; improvements in modulus determination can result from larger specimens; 0.5 is questioned as a value for Poisson's ratio; and at the time of construction the mat foundation for this building was the most economical under the stated design conditions.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number7338
NPARC number20374650
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Record identifier9480ac2b-5184-4ab3-9b8d-e537f9055fe6
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-07-13
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