Design and economics of a hybrid membrane–temperature swing adsorption process for upgrading biogas

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.memsci.2012.02.040
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Membrane Science
ISSN0376-7388
Volume413-414
Pages1728; # of pages: 12
SubjectProcess design and optimization; Hollow fiber membrane; Pressure ratio; Recycling; Biogas emission; Capital and operating cost; Economic analysis
AbstractProcessing biogas from wastewater digesters allows recovery of valuable methane and reduction in green house gas emissions. A two-stage membrane process, coupled with a temperature-swing-adsorption (TSA) as pre-treatment, was designed to generate pipeline quality methane. To improve methane recovery and process energy efficiency, the non-product streams of the membrane process were recycled and the permeate of the first membrane stage was maintained at a given pressure as the driving force for second membrane stage. The membrane process design was optimized by minimizing the objective function; the overall processing cost. It was found the membrane approach excels the PSA for producing pipeline quality methane (97% purity) in terms of methane recovery, processing cost and lower emissions. A techno-economic analysis showed that the payback time for an operation processing 200 Nm(3)/h of biogas was 6.8 months.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierS0376738812001561
NRC number53059
NPARC number21268481
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Record identifier95c322c7-6a0a-4d89-a4d8-99b1e01d45a3
Record created2013-07-26
Record modified2016-05-09
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