Importance of correlation between reverberation times for calculating the uncertainty of measurements according to ISO 354 and ISO 17497-1

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1121/1.4988884
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TypeArticle
Journal titleThe Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
ISSN0001-4966
Volume141
Issue5
Pages39293929
AbstractThe calculation of measurement uncertainties follows the law of error propagation as described in the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurements (GUM). The result can be expressed as a contribution of the variances of the individual input quantities and an additional term related to the correlation between the input quantities. In practical applications, the correlations are usually neglected. This has, e.g., led to the expression included in Annex A of ISO 17497-1 to calculate the precision of the measurement of random-incidence scattering coefficients. To determine whether it is actually justified to neglect the input correlations, this contribution investigates the correlations between the reverberation times used to determine the random-incidence absorption coefficient (ISO 354) and scattering coefficient (ISO 17497-1) in a reverberation chamber. The data used here are taken from measurements in a real-scale and a small-scale reverberation chamber. It is found that for ISO 354 correlations can be neglected. However, for ISO 17497-1, it is important to take correlations into account to obtain the correct measurement uncertainty using error propagation.
Publication date
PublisherAcoustical Society of America
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationConstruction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23002326
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Record identifier96779cae-f653-482d-8414-2941b889076b
Record created2017-10-18
Record modified2017-10-18
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