Complex fenestration systems: towards product ratings for indoor environment quality

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1365782806072673
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TypeArticle
Journal titleLighting Research and Technology
Volume39
IssueJune 2
Pages109122; # of pages: 14
Subjectcomplex fenestration system; complex glazing; window; SkyVision; indoor environment
AbstractComplex fenestration systems (CFS) include windows featuring complex glazing such as translucent and transparent insulation, solar control films, patterned or decorative glass, in-between pane shades, etc. CFS are believed to exhibit superior energy performance, but may have adverse effects on environmental features important for building-occupant satisfaction requirements such as the outdoor view (connection to outside), indoor view (feeling of privacy), luminance (major factor for discomfort glare), and light diffusion quality (relates to uniformity of illuminance on work plane). This paper is part of a larger effort to rate complex fenestration systems for energy performance and indoor environment quality (IEQ). In the end, IEQ ratings must be derived from direct studies of how building occupants perceive the indoor environment conditions created by the installed fenestration product. As a first step, this work tackles the theoretical development of new metrics to rate CFS with regards to IEQ, namely the view impairment index, luminance index and light diffusion quality index. The new indices are applied to some typical CFS, namely a diffuse window, and a clear window combined with an interior shading screen, and integrated perforated Venetian blinds. The results show that the diffuse window may increase the luminance by more than 100% under clear sky conditions when compared with a clear window with a similar light transmittance. White coloured Venetian blinds may increase the window luminance by up to 50% and reduce the outdoor view by up to 66% as compared with a clear window with a similar light transmittance.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number45654
17819
NPARC number20377391
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Record identifier989a2ead-8dc5-4a07-944b-083b8647b6d1
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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