High-pressure studies of ferroelectric phases related to the earth and planetary interiors

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/0031-9201(78)90003-1
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titlePhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors
Volume17
Issue1
Pages15; # of pages: 5
SubjectChemical bonds; crystal growth; dielectric properties; Earth (planet); ferroelectricity; high pressure; phase transformations; planetary composition; polycrystals; single crystals
AbstractTo determine the effects of high pressure constraints on the overall behaviour of ferroelectrics (FE) of both the perovskite "soft-mode" and hydrogen-bonded types, the authors have conducted dielectric property measurements to 5.5 GPa have been conducted on single crystals and polycrystalline aggregates of several ferroelectrics (BaTiO₃, Pb(Zr, Ti)O₃, triglycine sulfate, Rochelle salt) for the purpose of determining the effects of high-pressure constraints on the overall behavior of ferroelectrics (FE) of both the perovskite 'soft-mode' and hydrogen-bonded types. It is found that dielectric hysteresis is possible in FE which are under high-pressure conditions of deviatoric stresses and strains in which the FE phase forms part of a composite system. The results indicate that the continued stability of these FE phases is not restricted to a particular polarization mechanism. The results also show that existing FE states occurring as elastic and dielectric inhomogeneities can persist to much higher pressures than expected on the basis of the pressure dependence of isolated and unconstrained FE crystals.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12328063
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Record identifier98b20e55-2544-4261-9ba0-b9895219bd5f
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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