Small ice particles in tropospheric clouds: Fact or artifact? Airborne icing instrumentation evaluation experiment

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1175/2010BAMS3141.1
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBulletin of the American Meteorological Society
ISSN0003-0007
Volume92
Issue8
Pages967973; # of pages: 7
SubjectAircraft measurement; Evaluation experiments; Experimental evidence; High-speed video; Ice clouds; Ice particles; Inter-arrival time; Microphysical characterization; NASA Glenn; Probe geometry; Probe tips; Tropospheric clouds; Clouds; NASA; Particle size analysis; Probes; Video recording; Wind tunnels; Ice
AbstractThe evidence for crystal bouncing and small ice article shattering is presented from wind tunnel studies and aircraft measurements using modified probe geometries. Direct experimental evidence for the shattering hypothesis is obtained with high-speed video recording led by the NASA Glenn Research Center, with support from Environment Canada (EC) at the Cox and Co. wind tunnel. The results show that contamination of particle size distribution caused by shattering of ice particles on probe tips and inlets is a significant problem for airborne microphysical characterization of ice clouds. Large ice particles are found to produce a higher level of contamination with their artifacts than small ice particles. The results also show that by modifying the probe inlets and by applying interarrival time algorithms, the effects of shattering can be significantly reduced.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271719
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Record identifier9961960a-7edd-420d-9cff-14c645433b31
Record created2014-03-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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