Susceptibility-weighted imaging in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of multiple sclerosis indicates elevated deoxyhemoglobin, iron deposition and demyelination

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1352458512460602
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TypeArticle
Journal titleMultiple Sclerosis
ISSN1352-4585
Volume19
Issue6
Pages721731; # of pages: 11
Subjectdeoxyhemoglobin; iron; myelin; allergic encephalomyelitis; animal experiment; animal model; animal tissue; article; cerebellum; controlled study; demyelination; disease model; female; gray matter; inflammation; lumbar spinal cord; mouse; multiple sclerosis; nonhuman; signal processing; susceptibility weighted imaging; white matter
AbstractBackground: Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is an iron-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method that has shown iron-related lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The contribution of deoxyhemoglobin to the signals seen in SWI has not been well characterized in MS. Objectives: To determine if SWI lesions (seen as focal hypointensities) exist in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model of MS, and to determine whether the lesions relate to iron deposits, inflammation, demyelination, and/or deoxyhemoglobin in the vasculature. Methods: We performed SWI on the lumbar spinal cord and cerebellum of EAE and control mice (both complete Freund's adjuvant/pertussis toxin (CFA/PTX)-immunized and naive). We also performed SWI on mice before and after perfusion (to remove blood from vessels). SWI lesions were counted and their locations were compared to histology for iron, myelin and inflammation. Results: SWI lesions were found to exist in the EAE model. Many lesions seen by SWI were not present after perfusion, especially at the grey/white matter boundary of the lumbar spinal cord and in the cerebellum, indicating that these lesion signals were associated with deoxyhemoglobin present in the lumen of vessels. We also observed SWI lesions in the white matter of the lumbar spinal cord that corresponded to iron deposition, inflammation and demyelination. In the cerebellum, SWI lesions were present in white matter tracts, where we found histological evidence of inflammatory perivascular cuffs. Conclusions: SWI lesions exist in EAE mice. Many lesions seen in SWI were a result of deoxyhemoglobin in the blood, and so may indicate areas of hypoxia. A smaller number of SWI lesions coincided with parenchymal iron, demyelination, and/or inflammation. © The Author(s) 2012.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics (IBD-IBD)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269806
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Record identifier9a3034e2-7db6-40d4-9754-1c7a3e554f7d
Record created2013-12-13
Record modified2016-05-09
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