Influence of cutting shoe size in self-boring pressuremeter tests in sensitive clays

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TypeArticle
Journal titleCanadian Geotechnical Journal
ISSN0008-3674
Volume17
Issue2
Pages165173; # of pages: 9
Subjectpressure meters; soil testing equipment; shear strength; sensitive clay
AbstractThis paper examines the influence of the cutting shoe size of a pressuremeter apparatus in the light of soil behaviour after some unloading and loading. An oversized cutting shoe creates a gap between the borehole and the pressuremeter probe, causing a stress release with a probable consequence of overestimating the shear strength of the soil. An undersized cutting shoe imposes a certain load to the surrounding soil prior to the pressuremeter test, thus introducing errors in measuring the stress-strain relationship of the soil. To gain a quantitative idea of such an influence, Cambridge self-boring pressuremeter tests were carried out on Leda clay at two sites in the Ottawa region. It was found that in the case of an oversized cutting shoe, both the modulus and shear strength were overestimated by about 30 and 80% respectively. In the case of an undersized cutting shoe, the shear resistance was reduced at small strains. In both cases, however, the stress-strain relationship beyond a moderate strain (5%) showed little dependence on the cutting shoe-size.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierDBR-P-896
NRC number18097
80
NPARC number20331520
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Record identifier9b012fba-bc64-4074-8596-4854370de5f3
Record created2012-07-18
Record modified2016-05-09
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