Practical correlation for thermal resistance of low-sloped enclosed airspaces with downward heat flow for building applications

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10789669.2013.834779
AuthorSearch for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleHVAC and R Research
ISSN1078-9669
Volume20
Issue1
Pages92112; # of pages: 21
AbstractThe 2009 ASHRAE Handbook - Fundamentals (Chapter 26) provided a table that contains the thermal resistances (R-values) of vertical, horizontal, and high-sloped (45°) enclosed airspaces. This table is extensively used by modelers, architects, and building designers in the design for the R-values of building enclosures. The effect of the airspace aspect ratio and the inclination angle (θ) of 30° on the R-values are not accounted for in the ASHRAE table. However, previous studies showed that the aspect ratio of the airspace can affect its R-value. In this article, the previous studies that focused on determining the R-values for vertical, horizontal, and high-sloped enclosed airspaces are extended to investigate the effect of the aspect ratio on the R-values of low-sloped (θ = 30°) enclosed airspaces under downward heat flow for different airspace thicknesses and having a wide range of values for the effective emittance, mean temperature, and temperature differences across the airspaces. Thereafter, practical correlation is developed for determining the R-values of low-sloped enclosed airspaces for future use by modelers, architects, and building designers.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationConstruction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberNRC-CONST-55415
NPARC number21270759
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Record identifier9b8e8ebb-c39d-40eb-a58d-b48961d18639
Record created2014-02-17
Record modified2016-05-09
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