Iceberg risk to seabed installations on the Grand Banks

Download
  1. (PDF, 283 KB)
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Proceedings titleProceedings of the 16th International Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions POAC舗01
Conference16th International Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions (POAC'01), August 12-17, 2001, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Volume2
Pages10191028; # of pages: 10
AbstractThe design of seabed installations and pipelines on the Grand Banks is influenced by the presence of icebergs. Particularly for those installations placed below the mudline, scouring icebergs are of concern. In the present study, data from the Grand Banks Scour Catalogue (GBSC) including a recent update from wellsite surveys were summarized for the northeastern portion of the Grand Banks. Scour frequency was determined from the historical presence of icebergs, drift speeds and iceberg draft data, and was compared with frequency estimates derived from the observed density of scour marks on the seabed and the likely maximum age of these marks (2500 years). The probability of iceberg contact with installations below the mud-line was determined from the dimensions of the scour marks (from the GBSC) and their frequency. In addition, iceberg scour mechanisms were investigated through a comprehensive probabilistic model of the process, incorporating iceberg hydrostatic characteristics and seabed reaction forces.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Canadian Hydraulics Centre
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12328596
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier9babcf35-63d4-4372-ad1e-49d926b6392b
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)