Structural influence of hydrophobic diamine in sulfonated poly(sulfide sulfone imide) copolymers on medium temperature PEM fuel cell

Download
  1. (PDF, 1 MB)
  2. Get@NRC: Structural influence of hydrophobic diamine in sulfonated poly(sulfide sulfone imide) copolymers on medium temperature PEM fuel cell (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.polymer.2013.09.030
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titlePolymer (United Kingdom)
ISSN0032-3861
Volume55
Issue6
Pages13171326; # of pages: 10
SubjectMedium temperature PEMFC; Polymer electrolyte membrane; Sulfonated polyimide
AbstractSulfonated poly(sulfide sulfone imide) copolymers containing flexible sulfide bond and six-membered imide ring were synthesized by random polycondensation. Two types of membranes were prepared by using sulfide (S-PSI) and sulfide sulfone (S-PSFI) based non-sulfonated diamines to investigate the effects of the hydrophobic component. IECw values were controlled to 1.51-1.94 meq g-1 depending on the degree of sulfonation (DS) which was in the range of 50-80%. The membrane series showed good thermal stability up to 310 °C and mechanical properties (tensile strength >30 MPa). Dimensional stabilities were excellent with 23-35% increases, even at 100 °C. Proton conductivities of membranes composed of different hydrophobic diamines display a relatively good correlation with water content and morphology. In fuel cell tests, the S-PSI60 membrane shows relatively high current density of 250 mA cm-2 at 0.6 V and maximum power density of 175 mW cm-2 at 120 °C, 35% RH, 1.5 atm.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationEnergy, Mining and Environment; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberNRC-EME-53237
NPARC number21269692
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier9bd4f3f5-99e0-4418-ac42-b10f7778d98c
Record created2013-12-13
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)