Control strategies for lighting and ventilation in offices: effects on energy and occupants

Download
  1. (PDF, 440 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Control strategies for lighting and ventilation in offices: effects on energy and occupants (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.3763/inbi.2009.0004
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleIntelligent Buildings International
Volume1
Issue2
Pages101121; # of pages: 21
Subjectcomfort, demand response, lighting, load shedding, offices, organizational productivity, perosnal control, satisfaction, ventilation; Office lighting
AbstractParticipants (N=126) spent a day in a full-scale office laboratory, completing questionnaires and standard office tasks. Some participants experienced typical constant lighting and ventilation conditions, whereas others were given personal control over the dimming of lighting in their workstation and over the flow rate of air from a ceiling-based nozzle in their workstations. Half of the participants, some with personal control and some without, were exposed to environmental changes typical of demand-response load shedding in the afternoon: Workstation illuminance was reduced by 2%/min, and ambient air temperature increased by ~1.5 oC over a 2.5 hour period. Results showed that personal environmental control improved environmental satisfaction. Personal control over lighting led to an average energy reduction of around 10% compared to a typical fixed system; participants with personal control also reduced flow rate compared to the constant condition. Use of each control type averaged 2 ? 3 control actions per person per day, which dropped to less than one control action per person per day in a longer-term pilot study (N=5) conducted in the same space. Load shedding had some small negative effects for occupants, but in practice is unlikely to create substantial hardships, and is a reasonable response to peak power emergencies.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number49249
18353
NPARC number20377136
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier9bd585b5-95bb-4aab-8a5d-55d2e3b3e610
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)