Intrasasal vaccination against acinetobacter baumannii-associated pneumonia in mice

Alternative titleIntranasal immunization protects against Acinetobacter baumannii-associated pneumonia in mice
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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.02.083
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TypeArticle
Journal titleVaccine
ISSN0264-410X
SubjectAcinetobacter baumannii; Pneumonia; Mucosal immunization; B cells; Neutrophils
AbstractMultidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has become an important causative agent of healthcare associated infections. Hospital- and community-acquired pneumonia is the most common clinical manifestation of A. baumannii infection worldwide and is often associated with high mortality. Most experimental vaccine studies to date have evaluated vaccines against systemic A. baumannii infections following systemic immunization. We recently demonstrated that a mouse model of respiratory A. baumannii infection using the strain LAC-4 results in disease progression that is similar to that observed in humans. Here we used this model in conjunction with an inactivated whole cell vaccine to evaluate the feasibility of developing protective mucosal vaccines against respiratory A. baumannii infection and to investigate the potential mechanism of protection of such vaccines. Our results showed that intranasal immunization with formalin-killed whole cells of the LAC-4 strain elicited mucosal and systemic antigen-specific immune responses, and protected mice against lethal intranasal or intraperitoneal challenges. Compared to naïve mice, immunized mice had significantly fewer bacteria in their lungs, and the pathogen was barely detectable in blood and spleens at 24 h post challenge, indicating the ability of immunized mice to control extrapulmonary dissemination of the pathogen. Mechanistic studies using gene-deficient mice, neutropenic mice, or passive immunization showed that B cells and neutrophils, but not FcRγ, played crucial roles in the protection against respiratory A. baumannii challenge of intranasally immunized mice whereas passive transfer of hyperimmune sera only prolonged the survival time of challenged mice by 48 h. These results provide immunological insights for the rational design of novel mucosal vaccines to protect against respiratory A. baumannii infection and demonstrate the feasibility to develop such vaccines.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationHuman Health Therapeutics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberNRC-HHT-53214
NPARC number21272268
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Record identifier9c576581-fef6-40f7-9457-3d632b91cf45
Record created2014-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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