Structural investigation of cell wall polysaccharides of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 17

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.carres.2015.06.001
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TypeArticle
Journal titleCarbohydrate Research
ISSN0008-6215
Volume413
Pages9399
AbstractLactobacilli are valuable strains for commercial (functional) food fermentations. Their cell surface-associated polysaccharides (sPSs) possess important functional properties, such as acting as receptors for bacteriophages (bacterial viruses), influencing autolytic characteristics and providing protection against antimicrobial peptides. The current report provides an elaborate molecular description of several surface carbohydrates of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strain 17. The cell surface of this strain was shown to contain short chain poly(glycerophosphate) teichoic acids and at least two different sPSs, designated here as sPS1 and sPS2, whose chemical structures were examined by 2D nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and methylation analysis. Neutral branched sPS1, extracted with n-butanol, was shown to be composed of hexasaccharide repeating units (-[α-d-Glcp-(1-3)-]-4-β-l-Rhap2OAc-4-β-d-Glcp-[α-d-Galp-(1-3)]-4-α-Rhap-3-α-d-Galp-), while the major component of the TCA-extracted sPS2 was demonstrated to be a linear d-galactan with the repeating unit structure being (-[Gro-3P-(1-6)-]-3-β-Galf-3-α-Galp-2-β-Galf-6-β-Galf-3-β-Galp-).
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationHuman Health Therapeutics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001612
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Record identifier9c915fe4-27a8-4ece-b4ea-32fb99227067
Record created2017-03-10
Record modified2017-03-10
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