Volume stability of hydrated Portland cement phases exposed to aggressive solutions

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TypeArticle
Journal titleL'industria italiana del Cemento
IssueDec 782
Pages954967; # of pages: 14
SubjectConcrete
AbstractThe durability of concrete and its constituent phases continue to receive significant international attention. Concrete exposed to aggressive environments such as aqueous chloride or sulfate solutions often sustains damage as a result of excessive volume change. Phenomena associated with the deterioration process generally described by the term sulfate attack have received much recent attention in North America due to litigation. Skalny and Pierce reviewed and discussed the sulfate attack issue with respect to the physico-chemical phenomena involved in both laboratory and field observation. Sulfate attack issues discussed included the correctness of disassociating the purely physical (e,g. alkali-sulfate salt crystallizing in pores) and chemical processes involving decomposition of the cement paste by the penetrating sulfate solution. These processes (physico~chemical in nature) are often ascribed to phenomena that include crystal growth and pressure generation and colloidal swelling. Reaction products such as ettringite and gypsum have been considered to be central to the mechanisms involved. Large volume changes can also result from hydration of anhydrous alkali salts as the specific volume of the hydrated salt is significantly greater. These are considered by many to be non-classical.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number38586
15300
NPARC number20386559
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Record identifier9d15a1c3-4344-4982-994b-c385faa1d809
Record created2012-07-25
Record modified2016-05-09
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